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20130124
20130201
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
's republicans a-- house republicans agreed to suspend the debt ceiling. a measure that the democratically controlled senate agreed to vote on. we went to capitol hill to meet with senator mac thornberry of texas who's the number two republican. i asked him what he thought about the guidance and whether it answered the questions that gop members have been raising. >> not really. i think a lot of us wanted dod to be serious about explaining the effects of sequestration before we ever got to this point and that would have in our judgment helped motivate people to find another way. other spending cuts to take the place of the sequestration. and i still think there are a lot of questions as the services work through there with some -- this with some accounts exempt. some not. some are going to be hit pretty hard. >> overall from a good fashion and at least trying to make clear that some of those are going to be dramatic cuts? >> it was a beginning but i still think there are lots of details to be fleshed out that most people including most members of congress don't fully appreciate. just how p
the debt ceiling until the middle of may. senate democrats say they will pass the bill soon and the white house says president obama will not veto it. the debt ceiling is the limit on how much the feds can borrow. republican leaders were refusing to raise it without an equal amount of spending cuts. but the bill they just passed has a new ultimatum for the house and the senate. no budget, no pay. carl cameron in the d.c. newsroom tonight. how is this supposed to break the gridlock? >> hey, shep. it's basically a two-part deal. the first says by april 15th, both the house and the senate each have to pass a budget that balances in 10 years. should either chamber fail then its members paychecks can't be delayed. they can't stop it constitutionally they have to get paid. the other part suspends enforcement of the federal debt limit until may 19th, at which point it will increase retroactively without any offset in spending cuts. here is how speaker john boehner summed it up today. >> you know, the premise here is pretty simple. it says that there should be no long-term increase in the debt li
consistently said he'd refuse to negotiate around the debt ceiling. his strategy is vindicated now that the republicans have backed off their threats to take the nation into a default. the president stared down the republicans. they blinked. >> ifill: congress still faces other fiscal fights. automatic spending cuts are due to kick in on march first, and funding for the government runs out march 27. so, can the republican party use fiscal issues to regain its footing? for more on the political fights ahead we turn to susan page, washington bureau chief for "u.s.a. today." and stuart rothenberg of the "rothenberg political report" and "roll call." chuck schumer just said the republicans brinked. did they blink, susan, and does it matter if they did? >> i think a big recalbraigz on their part. they find themselves on the defensive when it comes to the debt ceiling issue. remember how they vowed they would only raise the debt ceiling by a dollar for every dollar cut in spending. now they said never mind. we'll push that down the road. the big fight will be on the sweeping spending cut
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)